Fun with felting

DSC_4370Well…not too much fun, especially if you are a beginner in the needle felting world. The reasons for that have to do with pricking your fingers now and then and if you are not careful and you stab too hard, there will be blood.DSC_4039.JPG    They do have little finger covers but they seem to get in the way to me, so I rather take my chances. There are different types of needles to work with as well. The single needle is for small and detailed work. Then there is the one with several needles together to help with those larger pieces or to get more done at a faster pace.

DSC_4282.JPG You will also need some sort of pad to work on while you are felting, With some of the burlap I bought at a church sale, I made one by sewing two pieces of 5″ by 6″ burlap together and stuffed it with rice. You may have to double up on the fabric, especially if you are a beginner, since beginners tend to stab too hard when they first start out. You can also use kitchen sponges or Styrofoam.DSC_4301.JPG My husband bought me a needle felting kit a couple years ago for Christmas and once and awhile, I will get my supplies out and try to practice this new skill. Word to the wise though…don’t try this while streaming shows on Netflix. I always feel guilty if I’m not multitasking, I think it’s a mom thing. So even in my down time, I still need to be doing something else while waiting for laundry to finish…just don’t try it. Needle felting takes all your attention.

DSC_4174.JPG Felt beads are pretty easy to start off with. Just take a pile of felt wool and fold over to form a circular shape and stab with your needle to lock in place. Continue doing this by pinching to form a ball while stabbing to lock in place, over and over until a circle is formed. Do not stab hard with your needle, you don’t need to kill your wool, just form a shape. Sadly, I learned that lesson the hard way, so my fingers suffered for it.

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Continue lightly stabbing your felt bead with the needle until it is smooth. It doesn’t take long to do these little beads and they look great as ornaments on your Christmas trees. Just get a needle and some fishing thread and thread through beads to hang from trees. You can also sew together a really nice bracelet or necklace. DSC_4189.JPG After you get the hang of how needle felting works you can move onto other shapes. These little sheep, which are very tiny, did not take long at all. They will make adorable little ornaments for Christmas. I used dried grape vine twigs for their legs.

DSC_4057.JPG My family has already put in their request for their “Christmas in July” hand made gifts, which include some little grey bunnies for my daughter.

DSC_4061.JPGMy husband requested a whale…he would. The whale turned out to be a little difficult. It is okay though, since this is a new skill. I am still in the early stages. So practice and patience helps a lot when starting a new hobby. Remember, don’t throw the towel in yet, baby steps are a must for needle felting. My husband isn’t picky, I am sure this attempt at a whale will make him laugh later.

DSC_4269.JPG For my son, I will attempt to needle felt his cat Sammy. Attempt is the key word here. I hope this comes out. I used pipe cleaners to form the body and am now in the process of needle felting wool around the pipe cleaners to form a body shape.

DSC_4277.JPG I think the easiest form to shape after little felt beads is hearts. You just stab in the middle of your beads to start out the heart shapes.

DSC_4066.JPG The wool you use for needle felting comes in so many colors, it is fun just thinking of things to create.DSC_4234.JPG So remember to go slowly, don’t stab hard and always pay attention.

DSC_4079.JPGOnce you get the hang of things you will have a whole tree full of fuzzy little hand made ornaments that everyone will love. Don’t be surprised when people start putting request in for little gifts for you to make.DSC_4082.JPG

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